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Stage 4 5 Prostate Cancer

Stage 4 Prostate Cancer: Survival Rates Treatment And Support

The Five Stages of Prostate Cancer | Prostate Cancer Staging Guide

    Prostate cancer is in stage 4 when the cancer spreads beyond the lymph nodes and into other areas of the body. While the vast majority of prostate cancer cases are caught before this happens, when the cancer is treatable, stage 4 is far more difficult to treat. Therefore, the survival rate among men with stage 4 prostate cancer is much lower.

    There are two types of stage 4 prostate cancer: 4A and 4B, according to the American Cancer Society. The type assigned to a persons diagnosis is based on whether the cancer has spread and to what degree, and the value assigned to two additional factors called the Grade Group and the prostate-specific antigen . The Grade Group is a measure of how likely the cancer is to spread quickly, and the PSA is a measure of a protein in the blood produced by cells in the prostate.

    With stage 4A, the tumor has already spread into the lymph nodes and may be spreading into tissues adjacent to the prostate, but has not spread to other areas of the body. The Grade Group can be of any value, as can the PSA.

    With stage 4B, the tumor may have spread into the lymph nodes, may be spreading into nearby tissues and has spread to other areas of the body like the bones, certain organs and distant lymph nodes. The Grade Group and PSA can be of any value.

    Proactive Steps You Can Take

    Diet and Exercise

    According to the Prostate Cancer Foundation, a few minor changes to eating habits can be helpful for those dealing with the effects of prostate cancer. The organization recommends incorporating vegetables into many of your meals and minimizing fat intake from red meat and dairy products. The group also recommends getting vitamins from food sources like whole grains and vegetables as opposed to vitamin supplements. It is particularly important to get calcium from food sources, namely dark green leafy vegetables and low-fat dairy foods.

    Coping and support

    If you or a loved one has prostate cancer, it’s important to remember that you are not alone: More than 150,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year, according to the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

    Still, it is normal for men diagnosed with prostate cancer to feel alone, uncertain or fearful. Support groups are an excellent resource for men with prostate cancer, providing a community with whom to share encouragement, information and emotional support. These groups range from online communities with people who can help answer questions to groups of men diagnosed with prostate cancer or family members of those diagnosed. They are sometimes facilitated by mental health professionals and experts in the field of prostate cancer.

    Palliative care

    Palliative care can include any of the following:

    Stage 4 Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    Doctors need to know how far the cancer has advanced, or its stage, in order to choose the best treatment. A pathologist, a specialist who specializes in studying cells obtained from a prostate biopsy, will provide two starting points: the cancers grade and Gleason score.

    • Cancer grade: When the pathologist looks at prostate cancer cells, the most common type of cells will get a grade of 3 to 5. The area of cancer cells in the prostate will also be graded. The higher the grade, the more abnormal the cells.
    • Gleason score: The two grades will be added together to get a Gleason score. This score tells doctors how likely the cancer is to grow and spread.

    After a biopsy reveals prostate cancer, the patient may be subjected to additional testing to determine whether the disease has spread to other regions of the body via the blood or lymph nodes. These are typically imaging examinations, such as a bone scan, positron emission tomography scan, or computed tomography scan.

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    What Will Happen In The Last Few Days

    It can help to know what is normal in the last few days of life so that you know what to expect. You might not be aware of these changes when they happen because you may be drowsy or unconscious.

    If you’re supporting someone who is dying, read about what you can do to help and how you can get support.

    Pain

    Many people worry about being in pain when they are dying. Some people do get pain if their prostate cancer presses on their nerves or makes their bones weak. But not everyone dying from prostate cancer has pain. And if you are in pain, there are things that can help to reduce and manage pain.

    You should tell your doctor or nurse if youre in pain or if your pain gets worse. They can talk with you about how best to manage your pain and can help keep it under control.

    You may find sitting or lying in some positions more comfortable than others, so ask if you need help getting into a different position.

    Your doctor can give you medicines to help manage pain. The type of medicines they give you will depend on what is causing the pain and which medicines are suitable.

    Your doctor will monitor how the pain medicines are working and may change the type of medicine or the dose. If youre still in pain or get pain in between taking medicines, its important to tell your doctor or nurse.

    Sleeping and feeling drowsy

    Not recognising people

    Feeling restless or agitated

    Changes in skin temperature or colour

    Changes in breathing

    Loss of appetite

    Changes in urinating or bowel movements

    Gleason Prostate Cancer Score

    Prostate Cancer Stages

    1960s as a way to measure how aggressive your prostate cancer may be.

    A pathologist determines your Gleason score by looking at a biopsy of your prostate tissue under a microscope. They grade the cells in the biopsy on a scale of 1 to 5. Grade 1 cells are healthy prostate, whereas grade 5 cells are highly mutated and dont resemble healthy cells at all.

    The pathologist will calculate your Gleason score by adding together the number of the most prevalent type of cell in the sample and the second most prevalent type of cell.

    For example, if the most common cell grade in your sample is 4 and the second most common is 4, you would have a score of 8.

    A Gleason score of 6 is considered low-grade cancer, 7 is intermediate, and 8 to 10 is high-grade cancer.

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    What Is The Survival Rate Of Stage 4 Prostate Cancer

    Doctors use the term stage to characterize the characteristics of the original tumor itself, such as its size and how far prostate cancer has spread when it is discovered, as they do with all malignancies.

    Staging systems are difficult to understand. Most malignancies, including prostate cancer, are staged using three different elements of tumor growth and dissemination. The TNM system stands for tumor, nodes, and metastasis:

    • T, for tumor describes the size of the main area of prostate cancer.
    • N, for nodes, describes whether prostate cancer has spread to any lymph nodes, and how many and in what locations.
    • M, for metastasis, means distant spread of prostate cancer, for example, to the bones or liver.

    The TNM approach allows each mans prostate cancer to be characterized in depth and compared to the prostate cancers of other men. Doctors utilize this information to conduct research and make treatment decisions.

    However, in terms of prostate cancer survival statistics, the staging method is straightforward. As previously stated, males with prostate cancer can be split into two groups in terms of survival rates:

    • Men with prostate cancer that is localized to the prostate or just nearby.
    • Prostate cancer has a high long-term survival percentage in these men. Almost all men will live for more than five years after being diagnosed with prostate cancer, and many will live for much longer.
    • Men whose prostate cancer has spread to distant areas, like their bones.

    What Is A 5

    A relative survival rate compares people with the same type and stage of cancer to people in the overall population. For example, if the 5-year relative survival rate for a specific stage of prostate cancer is 90%, it means that men who have that cancer are, on average, about 90% as likely as men who dont have that cancer to live for at least 5 years after being diagnosed.

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    Stage 2 Prostate Cancer

    In stage 2, the tumor is still confined to your prostate and hasnt spread to lymph nodes or other parts of your body. A doctor may or may not be able to feel the tumor during a prostate exam, and it may appear on ultrasound imaging. The survival rate is still .

    The PSA score for stage 2 is less than 20 ng/mL.

    Stage 2 cancer is further divided into three phases depending on the grade group and Gleason scores:

    • Grade group: 1
    • Gleason score: 6 or less

    White Patients Derive A Larger Conditional Mortality Benefit Than Non

    Overview of the Teal Stage of Prostate Cancer | Prostate Cancer Staging Guide

    In order to determine whether race interacted with survival, we repeated our initial analyses after stratifying by race and by modeling an interaction term. Among patients with M1 disease, conditional mortality was similar between white and non-white patients . However, among patients with N1 disease, non-white patients did not have a significant reduction in conditional mortality at 5, 10, or 15 years of survival compared to diagnosis , while white patients had similar mortality as the overall cohort, with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.10 , 0.898 , and 0.712 , respectively. While non-white patients with T4 disease had improved 5-year PCSM after having survived 5, 10, or 15 years, their improvements were 20-39 % smaller than those of white patients .

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    Tnm Staging System The Most Widely Used Staging System For Prostate Cancer Isthe Ajcc Tnm System For Prostate Cancerthere Are 4 Stages Often The Stages 1 To 4 Are Written As The Roman Numeralsi Ii Iii And Iv Generally The Higher The Stage Number The More The Cancerhas Spread The Stages Can Be Further Divided Into A B Or C An Earlier Lettermeans A Lower Stage Talk To Your Doctor If You Have Questions About Staging Tnm Staging Is Based On The Following: T Describes Thetumour And Whether Doctors Can Feel It Or See It On Imaging Tests It Alsodescribes Whether The Tumour Has Grown Outside Of The Prostate To Thesurrounding Tissues T Is Usually Given As A Number From 1 To 4 A Highernumber Means That The Tumour Takes Up More Of The Prostate Or That The Tumourhas Grown Outside Of The Prostate Into Nearby Tissues Some Stages Are Alsodivided Further Into A B Or C An Earlier Letter Means A Lower Stage The Clinical T Is Your Doctor’s Best Estimate Of Theextent Of The Cancer Based On A Physical Exam A Digital Rectal Exam A Prostatebiopsy And Imaging Tests If You Have Surgery To Remove Your Prostate Apathological T Will Be Given Pt Is More Accurate Than Ct T The Tumour Has Grown Outside The Prostate And Into The Seminal Vesicles T4 The Tumour Has Grown Outside The Prostate And Into Nearby Structures Suchas The Bladder Rectum Pelvic Muscles And Pelvic Wall

    N describeswhether the cancer has spread to lymph nodes near the prostate. N0 means that thecancer hasn’t spread to any nearby lymph nodes. N1 means that it has spread tonearby lymph nodes.

    M describeswhether the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. M0 means that the cancerhas not spread to other parts of the body. M1 means that it has spread to otherparts of the body.

    PSA level describes the amount of the prostate-specificantigen in the blood.

    Grade Group is a measureof how likely the cancer is to grow and spread.

    So What Are The Stages Of Prostate Cancer

    Staging of a prostate cancer means classifying the cancer according to how far it has spread and its effects on the prostate. The staging system helps in tailoring treatment to properly address the tumor.

    To determine the stage of a cancer, your doctor will use a number of indicators. For instance, your doctor will use the TNM system, which has three different aspects. Tumor describes the size of the main area of the cancer, nodes identifies whether the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes and to what extent, while metastasis describes how far from the prostate the cancer has spread.

    Similarly, your physician will use the Gleason score and the grade group score to stage the cancer. The higher the Gleason or grade group score, the more aggressive and widely spread the cancer. Plus, your doctor will use the PSA level, ultrasound, MRI, CT scans, nuclear scans, and surgery to correctly stage the cancer.

  • Stage I Prostate Cancer
  • The least advanced prostate cancer, usually small and not yet spread beyond the prostate, is called stage I prostate cancer. It is characterized by a PSA level thats less than10 ng/mL, a Gleason score of 6, and a grade group score of 1. The cancer has a 5-year survival rate of almost 100 percent.

    Stage I prostate cancer is managed by active surveillance for nearly all patients with a Gleason score of 6, unless the patient is unwilling or unable to undergo additional biopsies or has high-volume disease.

  • State II Prostate Cancer
  • Stage III prostate cancer
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    How The Study Was Performed

    During the study, scientists randomized 1,071 men with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer into four groups. One group received radiation and six months of an anti-testosterone drug called leuporelin, and the second group received radiation plus 18 months of leuporelin therapy. Two other groups were treated with the same regimens of either radiation plus six or 18 months of leuporelin therapy, along with another drug called zoledronic acid, which helps to limit skeletal pain and related complications should cancer spread to the bones. Study enrollment occurred between 2003 and 2007 at 23 treatment centers across New Zealand and Australia.

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    Treatment By Stage Of Prostate Cancer

    PPT

    Different treatments may be recommended for each stage of prostate cancer. Your doctor will work with you to develop a specific treatment plan based on the cancers stage and other factors. Detailed descriptions of each type of treatment are provided earlier on this same page. Clinical trials may also be a treatment option for each stage.

    Early-stage prostate cancer

    Early-stage prostate cancer usually grows very slowly and may take years to cause any symptoms or other health problems, if it ever does at all. As a result, active surveillance or watchful waiting may be recommended. Radiation therapy or surgery may also be suggested, as well as treatment in clinical trials. For those with a higher Gleason score, the cancer may be faster growing, so radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy are often recommended. Your doctor will consider your age and general health before recommending a treatment plan.

    ASCO, the American Urological Association, American Society of Radiation Oncology, and the Society of Urologic Oncology recommend that patients with high-risk early-stage prostate cancer that has not spread to other areas of the body should receive radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy with hormonal therapy as standard treatment options.

    Locally advanced prostate cancer

    Watchful waiting may be considered for older adults who are not expected to live for a long time and whose cancer is not causing symptoms or for those who have another, more serious illness.

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    What Does It Mean To Have Stage 5 Prostate Cancer

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    Staging And Grading For Stage 4 Cancer

    Most cancers are staged using some form of the TNM system. Doctors may also use the TNM system to help determine the extent of certain cancers in each stage. The TNM system stands for:

    • T , or the size of the original tumor
    • N , or whether the cancer is present in the lymph nodes
    • M , or whether the cancer has spread to other parts of the body

    Not all cancers are staged using the TNM system, though. Some cancers, especially liquid cancers, are staged through different established protocols. The Binet and Rai systems, for example, are used to stage certain types of leukemia. Female reproductive system cancers, such as cervical cancer, are staged with a separate staging system created by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics .

    As your care team gathers information about your cancer for the purposes of staging, they may need to order several tests, including:

    Your care team may likely also need to perform a biopsy, a procedure that involves removing a sample of cells and analyzing it for signs of cancer. Imaging scans may be able to tell your care team where your cancer is, but looking at the cancer cells specifically tell them how fast they are likely to growor what grade they are.

    Grading is different from staging and is done for most, but not all, cancers.

    The grade of your cancer is part of how your cancer care team stages your cancer and determines your prognosis, or outlook.

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    How We Treat Prostate Cancer

    The prognosis for metastatic prostate cancer can be discouraging, but some treatment centerslike the Johns Hopkins Precision Medicine Center of Excellence for Prostate Cancerspecialize in innovative, individualized therapy with the potential to improve outcomes.

    How Long Can You Live With Prostate Cancer With No Treatment

    Life Expectancy with Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

    Studies have shown that between 86% and 98% of men with LPC do not die from their cancer in all age groups, the researchers wrote. In fact, more than 95% of patients with LPC live at least 10 years after their diagnosis, whereas only 25% of patients in this study expected to live more than 10 years.

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